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“OVER-DAMN-DELIVERED!”

Hey Folks, Thunder and Damnit! I bet you're just like me: a no-sense, school of hard knocks, entrepreneur on a mission. What do I love more than anything? When a business transaction goes off flawlessly. Let me to you why Roger knocked my socks off.

In my experience, it's really tough to find reliable people. The kind of people that you can partner with. It only took one transaction to learn that Roger is undoubtedly the best of the best. Why? Roger OVER-DAMN-DELIVERED.

He immediately “got it.” He understood my product and my niche market. Roger, through some strange and mysterious process, actually BECAME my customer. He gave me super powerful, juicy, and persuasive copy. There is no doubt in my mind we will be doing business in the future.

Charles Lumpkin III
Internet Marketing Jujitsu
Atlanta, Georgia

Advertising Mistake #3
Lack of Focus

There are three elements that absolutely must be in place to achieve success with advertising:

The Right Offer

Listen ... has anyone ever walked into your business and purchased one of everything you have? You’d think this were a common occurrence looking at many advertisements. They include everything, even the proverbial kitchen sink. And nothing is really being sold in these ads. It’s more a laundry list of product or service information.

Obviously for some businesses, this type of advertising makes a lot of sense – grocery stores and department stores for example. They cater to people who need food (everyone) and to bargain hunters (just about everyone). And their ads are usually displayed on multiple pages. You’ve got what? A space about the size of a business card or a post card.

If your clientele doesn’t load up the shopping cart on a weekly basis, you’re much better off offering the one item that’ll get ’em to respond now. So rather than confusing them with too many choices, get your foot in the door with the one offer they won’t be able to resist.

Put some thought into this.

It could be a coupon, a free seminar, a free trial, a free gift, a special report. The list can go on and on. You decide what will work best for your audience.

The Right Time

A residential alarm company did a brisk business after it mailed a direct solicitation to home owners in a neighborhood that continued to be plagued by a rash of burglaries. How did they beat the pants off the competition? The owners of this company understood human nature.

Think about it ...

A home a few blocks away is burglarized one night. Another down the street falls victim to the same fate a few nights later. The police have some clues but nobody’s been nabbed. How long will it take you to fear you might be the next victim?

The alarm company struck while the iron was hot. They knew they had the full, undivided attention of these concerned homeowners even before they mailed their solicitation. The timing was right.

The Right Audience

Surely you’ve heard about salespeople who are so good, they can sell ice to the Eskimos. As in the example above, could you sell an expensive diamond necklace or a giant plasma TV to someone whose neighbor just had their house cleaned out? It’s doubtful. A burglar alarm or a Doberman would be a much better bet.

And note what the alarm company did not do. They did not put an ad in the local paper. They used direct mail. And they did not mail their solicitation outside the affected neighborhood. Why? It would have been a waste of money. You see, the further away from the burglarized neighborhood people lived, the less concerned they were about the crimes. They perceived the burglaries to be someone else’s problem. It simply didn’t affect them.

So the right audience for you is the one that can fully appreciate your offer. They’re the people in the center of the bulls eye. The more exclusive the market and the more niche-oriented your product or service, the more targeted your advertising must be. Remember, unless you own a grocery store, not everyone will want what you sell all the time.

Now let’s get down to the nitty-gritty and fix the mistakes I see in just about every ad today.